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The interface to send out a missile alert in Hawaii is slightly less bad
Yesterday the Office of the Governor of Hawaii sent Honolulu Civil Beat a screenshot of what it said was a list of options that employees saw when they sent out alerts to citizens. The bad layout and confusing wording made it clear that the employee was less to blame than bad design.

But late Tuesday the Governor’s office told Honolulu Civil Beat that it circulated a false image. "We asked (Hawaii Emergency Management Agency) for a screenshot and that’s what they gave us," Governor’s office spokeswoman Jodi Leong told Civil Beat. "At no time did anybody tell me it wasn’t a screenshot."

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Flu stresses hospitals, shows we’re not ready for emergencies

Alabama has a flu emergency. Schools have closed in San Antonio and Cleveland and Oklahoma.

Think hospitals are under a strain now, from a slightly bad flu season? Wait until a really bad one hits.

Experts agree the U.S. is not ready for a bad epidemic, or even for some other disaster that would affect hospital supplies. And funding cuts mean even a little strain has a bigger impact than in years past.

This year’s flu season is moderately severe, but not anywhere close to being one for the record books. So far, it’s not as bad as the 2014-2015 flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

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arstechnica Spectre and Meltdown patches causing trouble as realistic attacks get closer
Applications, operating systems, and firmware all need to be updated to defeat Meltdown and protect against Spectre, two attacks that exploit features of high-performance processors to leak information and undermine system security. The computing industry has been scrambling to respond after news of the problem broke early a few days into the new year.

But that patching is proving problematic. The Meltdown protection is revealing bugs or otherwise undesirable behavior in various drivers, and Intel is currently recommending that people cease installing a microcode update it issued to help tackle the Spectre problem. This comes as researchers are digging into the papers describing the issues and getting closer to weaponizing the research to turn it into a practical attack. With the bad guys sure to be doing the same, real-world attacks using this research are sure to follow soon.

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IV bags in short supply across US after Hurricane Maria
Before Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico on September 30, the United States had already experienced intermittent shortages of IV bags, which are used to administer and dilute medications. The devastation caused by the Category 4 hurricane -- the first to hit the island in more than eight decades -- amplified the IV bag shortage, in particular sodium chloride 0.9% injection bags, which are ubiquitous in medical facilities and hospitals.

Puerto Rico, which produces more pharmaceuticals by dollar value for the nation than any of the individual 50 states or any foreign country, has been key to the supply of these IV saline bags.

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